What Is Frequency Response? And Why Is It Important?

Have you ever heard about “frequency response?” Well, you can probably find this term (or something related to frequency) in almost all of the audio devices in your house. It is not difficult to understand, but you might understand it in different ways.

First of all, our ears can listen to the frequencies ranging from as low as 20Hz to as high as 20kHz. Though they can extend behind this dynamic, Their frequency response is always gauged within a range. Are you not quite sure? Don’t worry! Here we expose to you the best answer to the question “what is frequency response?”

What is Frequency Response?

The range of frequency response of different types of sound

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Every speaker tends to output these frequencies somewhere else within the range of 20Hz to 20kHz. Your microphone can also afford to catch somewhere in such audio range before reproducing it. It will help to gauge the output gain and specific levels of every frequency compared to the input gain.

Is it a little bit confusing for you? Let us explain more clearly! After hearing a story from a friend, you might like to tell somebody else for sure. When you share what you had heard, then you find yourself highlighting some parts of the events that your friend didn’t. And you probably forget some details before!

But the point here is that you repeated the story by coloring those details with your thoughts. And this is a general picture of how frequency response usually works.

Within that full range of 20 Hz - 20 kHz, the input signal should not boast a frequency above another. The full spectrum accompanies all frequencies degree, and what comes out is the FREQUENCY RESPONSE.

Frequency Response and Your Music Tastes

According to the scientific study, choosing brand new headphones would base on the options of your music tastes or genres. For instance, to any EDM, techno, Bollywood, or reggae, low frequencies are highly preferred. As it comes to higher frequencies, they enable everyone to experience every beat of a rock metal song. In case you’re a fan of Mozart or other classical artists, your music will be uncolored.

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You must listen as a whole, and if you come up with a headphone, having a wide frequency range, then it does not have to own the great sound quality. Besides, it’s not a facile task to gauge the frequency response of your headphone. How possible is it to achieve this? Well, you can put the correct mic between the headphones in the place of your head.

And owning a set of bassy headphones or even speakers will increase the lows while successfully recessing both highs and mid-range. At times, one product exhibits its sound signature that is one hybrid of more types.

The general frequency response might help - but it’s not just the element to decide how the sound is perceived. The speed that the notes play and linger at will impact on your listening experience.

Frequency Response Does Matters!

You must understand the cornerstone of everything related to audio. It all begins and stops with frequency response. For example, your amplifiers, speakers, mics, headphones, and other CD/DVD players must have as close to the ideal frequency response as possible. Or else, you can’t hear them sound right. How about getting started with the basics?

The sound waves we get as music, noise, or speech are often measured in cycles for each second. It’s abbreviated as Hz in honor of the German physicist Heinrich Hertz who serves an important role in the electromagnetic wave theory. We, as human, can listen to 20Hz in the bass to 20kHz in the treble. Both women and kids can listen to that high while one middle-aged man can make it at 13 - 14kHz.

The connection between audible frequencies and musical octaves would stay at 2:1, so when we can hear from 20Hz - 20kHz, that can be a span of these octaves: 20 - 40Hz, 40 - 80Hz, 80 - 160Hz, 320 - 625Hz.

Why Is Frequency Response Important?

An audio device having great frequency response will be able to play every low, middle, and high tone in the right way - and that’s what reminds our ears of if this is a high-fidelity unit that has a rich and lively sound or not. To help you learn frequency response, try to keep this in mind:

The sound’s loudness is displayed in a unit known as decibel (dB). 1dB is considered as the least change in SPL (sound pressure level). 3dB remains subtle in the loudness, while 10dB is double the loudness. When your speaker or headphone is said to own a frequency response of 40Hz - 20kHz, then it’s a range while 3dB is the variation. However, having 20 - 20kHz means totally nothing, and it even damages the credibility of whatever the manufacturer states.

So, your amplifier playing a song from a CD has to own a flat response for the range of your hearing (50Hz - 20,000Hz) so that it’s possible to hear the music once it’s recorded. Then, what is frequency response for a telephone? It would be around 200Hz - 5000Hz which is exactly the range of our voice.

Frequency Response Graph

You should learn how to read a frequency response through charts

It’s often represented by a graph that is quite the same as the equalization curve. It displays the connection between the X-axis frequencies to the vertical Y-axis fluctuation of voltage. Reading this graph feels simple since it often shows a certain range of frequencies from low to high in a horizontal way while the Sound Pressure Levels is seen in Decibels in a vertical way.

Besides, getting used to these ranges allows us to decide how a speaker sounds depending on the frequency response graph. It gives us an overall understanding of sound frequency response charts, and to do it well; you need to have a good knowledge of different variables related to the application.

For example, there are several elements that should be considered when we read a graph, including the interaction with other speakers, acoustics in the room, hearing capability and more.

Conclusion

So, what is frequency response? Did you get that? Hopefully, you can! For those who have already understood all this stuff, what our article can do is to offer you a great way to present it and teach it to anyone who doesn’t know it yet. This basic information on frequency response reveals the connection between frequency and musical octaves, the way our ears hear, and how such audio terms look like in a frequency response graph.

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Besides, getting used to these ranges allows us to decide how a speaker sounds depending on the frequency response graph. It gives us an overall understanding of sound frequency response charts, and to do it well; you need to have a good knowledge of different variables related to the application.

For example, there are several elements that should be considered when we read a graph, including the interaction with other speakers, acoustics in the room, hearing capability and more.

Conclusion

So, what is frequency response? Did you get that? Hopefully, you can! For those who have already understood all this stuff, what our article can do is to offer you a great way to present it and teach it to anyone who doesn’t know it yet. This basic information on frequency response reveals the connection between frequency and musical octaves, the way our ears hear, and how such audio terms look like in a frequency response graph.

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